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Health, Disease & Diet Find out the best tips and practices on managing your cat's diet, health care, and issues with diseases from our community of animal lovers

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Old 10-28-2010, 12:52 AM
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Default Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

Myths about Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

Myth or Fact?: I heard that neutered and spayed cats get fat and lazy. Is this true?

Spaying and neutering does change the metabolism of companion animals, so in most cases, they do not need as much food to maintain their weight as unspayed/unneutered animals. The problem is not with the animal - it is us. We just tend to overfeed our cats, and neutered/spayed cats are more apt to put on weight because of that.
As for laziness, again, the amount of exercise our cats receive and their activity levels are often dependent on us. If we do not give them opportunities for play and exercise, they can become couch potatoes just like some people.

Myth or Fact?:My veterinarian recommended I spay my new kitten and she is only two months old. Is that safe?

Early spaying/neutering has been shown to be safe in multiple studies. It must be remembered that younger animals may need different anesthetics and are more prone to hypothermia (lower than normal body temperature) during surgery. But as long as procedures are modified to account for these differences, early neutering is very safe. In fact, animals neutered at a younger age often have faster recoveries than those neutered when they are older.

Myth or Fact?: I was told I should let my cat go through one heat before I have her spayed. Is that what you recommend?

We recommend that cats be spayed before they have a heat. There are several reasons for this:
  • Any heat brings with it a chance your cat could become pregnant. This would adversely affect the health of a young cat.
  • A heat also brings with it the chance for accidents. Cats in heat try to leave their houses and yards to find mates and may be injured by other animals or hit by cars during their search.
  • Owners of females in heat also frequently have to deal with a sudden influx of male cats around the home and yard. These amorous visitors leave numerous droppings, and spray plants and trees with urine in an attempt to mark their new found territory, and can keep you up past 2 am with their howling.

A further reason for spaying cats is that cats who have been spayed have a 40-60% lower risk of developing mammary cancer than those who have not been spayed.

source: http://www.peteducation.com/article....1+2235&aid=908
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Old 10-28-2010, 12:55 AM
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Default Re: Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

Benefits of Neutering

Other than population control, there are lots of very, very good reasons to castrate (remove the testicles from) male cats. They basically fall into one of two categories – they are either behavioral or medical. Regardless of which category we are talking about, most of the unwanted characteristics or conditions are caused by the male hormone testosterone, which is produced within the testicle. That is the major reason vasectomies have never been that popular in veterinary medicine. This procedure eliminates successful breeding, but it does not reduce any of the undesirable problems of the intact male, since it does not affect testosterone production or the distribution of testosterone throughout the rest of the cat's body.

Behavioral advantages of neutering

Decreased Aggression: The (male) androgen hormones, of which testosterone is the most important, are responsible for the development of many behavioral patterns. Testosterone greatly affects aggression in cats. One of the most important behavioral advantages of castration is that as adults, these neutered cats will tend to be less aggressive toward other cats.

Decreased Spraying: Spraying urine is a normal sexual behavior of uncastrated male tomcats. Anyone who has smelled tomcat urine will quickly agree that spraying is a very unwanted behavior. Some unspayed and spayed females, and some castrated males, will spray, but it is much more common in unneutered males.

Decreased Roaming: Another behavioral advantage of neutering is that neutered cats are much less likely to react when they sense a female in heat. Male cats can sense females in heat through pheromones. These are airborne chemical attractants that are liberated from the female when she is cycling. They travel through the air for great distances. Male cats neutered at an early age will generally not sense or respond to pheromones, and would certainly be less stressed and tend to stay home if they are outdoor cats.

Medical Advantages

Reduced Injuries: The biggest medical advantage to neutering cats is really related to their behavior. Unneutered male cats fight to defend their territory. Such fights can be extremely serious, as abscesses often develop from the bite wounds. The veterinarians at the Drs. Foster and Smith Veterinary Medical Facility have seen many tomcats who are missing parts of their ears and tails, or have faces with multiple scars resulting from the fights they had with other toms. Indoor, neutered cats lead much healthier and longer lives.

Improved Genetics: We want breeding animals to be the best representatives of their species. The selection is best done by professional breeders. We certainly do not want unwanted traits like hereditary diseases or aggressive personalities passed on.

Early Neutering

In the United States, most cats are neutered between 4 and 6 months of age. Many animal shelters and veterinarians are starting to neuter male animals at a younger age, even 6-14 weeks of age. This early neutering does not affect the growth rate, and there are no appreciable differences in skeletal, physical, or behavioral development between those animals neutered early than those neutered at a more traditional age. It must be remembered that younger animals may need different anesthetics and are more prone to hypothermia (lower than normal body temperature) during surgery. As long as procedures are modified to account for these differences, early neutering is very safe. In fact, animals neutered at a younger age often have faster recoveries than those neutered when they are older.

Summary

The behavioral or medical problems caused by testosterone are common. Veterinarians deal with them on a daily basis. We do not want to see your pet suffer from a medical or behavioral problem that could have been prevented through neutering. Do your pet and yourself a good deed – by neutering your pet.

source: http://www.peteducation.com/article....1+2235&aid=910
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:01 AM
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Default Re: Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

Benefits of Spaying

Newspapers, radio, and television commonly feature articles about pet overpopulation. They stress the fact that too many kittens and puppies are produced every year and that there just are not enough potential owners to go around. The obvious conclusion is that we should breed fewer cats and dogs and produce fewer litters. The best way to ensure that this occurs is through sterilization procedures, so a larger percentage of cats and dogs are incapable of breeding. Performing an ovariohysterectomy (spaying) female animals is the best approach to decreasing the number of kittens and puppies. Being veterinarians, we also know that spaying and castrating pets are important to the average pet owner because of the health and well being of their animals. So, although you may spay your animals in an effort to help control a national problem, in doing so, you increase their chances of living long and healthy lives.

Having a litter of kittens may seem like a fun thing to do. Some even believe that it helps their female cat, in some way, to develop more completely or become a better pet. Neither is true. Becoming pregnant and having a litter of kittens in no way alters the maturity level of the cat, either physically or mentally. In most cases, people find out that it is hard to find good homes for all of the kittens, even if they are advertised "Free to a Good Home." In addition, not all pregnancies go smoothly. Difficult labor, kitten mortality, and potential health problems in the mother, such as uterine and mammary gland infections, can take all the fun out of the experience. Most of the clients we have worked with end up wishing that they had never allowed their female to have a litter. Professional breeders are prepared and equipped for the entire process and it should generally be left to them.

The female reproductive tract

The reproductive tract of the female cat begins with the ovaries where the ova (or eggs) are produced. When a female kitten is born, every egg that will be released by her ovaries over her lifetime is already present. The ova are, however, in an immature form and require further development to reach a stage that can be fertilized by sperm cells. When a cat's heat cycle starts, hormones stimulate the maturation of some of the ova or eggs. When the cat is bred, the ova are then released through the surface of the ovary and pass into the oviducts. These are tiny tubes that run between the ovaries and the horns of the uterus. It is within the oviducts that fertilization (the union of the sperm cell and ovum) occurs. The horns are the muscular section of the uterus between the oviducts and the body of the uterus. In an adult cat, the horns of the uterus are about six inches long and the diameter of a normal shoelace. When a cat is in heat, the uterus and the blood vessels to it will enlarge. When pregnant, this small uterus enlarges to hold several kittens. The uterus ends at the cervix of the cat. During pregnancy, most kittens develop within the uterine horns, but one may reside within the body of the uterus.

Birth control pills

There are birth control pills which can be used in cats, but they can have serious unwanted side effects such as the development of diabetes mellitus. They cannot be used for long periods of time.

Surgical sterilization

Since birth control pills are not a viable option, as a practical permanent form of sterilization, we are left with the surgical procedure called spaying (medically referred to as ovariohysterectomy). An ovariohysterectomy (OHE) is the complete removal of the female reproductive tract. The ovaries, oviducts, uterine horns, and body of the uterus are removed. Not only does this procedure prevent the animal from getting pregnant, but it also eliminates the heat cycles. The surgery removes the source of production of such hormones as estrogen and progesterone. These hormones are responsible for stimulating and controlling heat cycles and play a major role during pregnancy. But they also have other effects on the body and some of them are potentially harmful.

Disadvantages of not spaying your cat

An OHE eliminates most, if not all, of the female hormone production. In so doing, the real advantages of this procedure are realized. In humans, great efforts are undertaken to maintain or restore hormone production in the body if the ovaries are removed, but the same is not true for cats. These hormones play key roles in reproduction in the cat. However, they are also responsible for many unwanted side effects.
  • Estrus: Cats are 'spontaneous ovulators.' This means a cat will ovulate, or release the eggs from her ovaries, only if she is mated. If a female cat is in heat (she will be in heat for 3 to 16 days) and is not mated, she will come back into heat every 14 to 21 days until she is mated. Physiological and behavioral patterns press upon her to mate. Being locked in an apartment or house where this is impossible causes great anxiety and frustration (for her, and you).
  • Behavior and hygienic problems: During the heat cycle there are numerous behavior problems that may develop. Females in heat will actively search out male cats and may attempt to escape from the house or yard, putting them in the danger of traffic, fights with other animals, etc. Often there is a sudden influx of male cats around the home and yard. The howling at 2 a.m. will affect your behavior as well as your cat's. In addition, unspayed females may spray urine when they are heat. This can be difficult to stop, and it is highly recommended that such cats are spayed as part of the treatment.
  • Mammary cancer: Mammary cancer is the third most common cancer in cats. Reproductive hormones are one of the primary causes of mammary cancer in the cat. Cats who have been spayed have a 40-60% lower risk of developing mammary cancer than those who have not been spayed.
  • Tumors of the reproductive tract: Tumors also occur in the uterus and ovaries. An OHE would, of course, eliminate any possibility of this occurring. They are not commonly seen cancers in cats, but they do occur.
  • Infections of the reproductive tract:Unspayed cats may develop a severe uterine disease called pyometra. With this disorder, bacteria enter the uterus and it becomes filled with pus. The normal 6-inch long, thin horns of the uterus enlarge to 10 inches long and can become the diameter of a human thumb. Undetected, this condition is almost always fatal. In rare cases, when the condition is found early, hormonal and antibiotic therapy may be successful. This type of therapy is limited to valuable breeding animals. Generally, the treatment of pyometra requires a difficult and expensive ovariohysterectomy. The toxicities resulting from the infection can strain the kidneys or heart, and in some cases may be fatal or cause life long problems, even after the infected uterus has been removed.
  • Behavior and hygienic problems: During the heat cycle there are numerous problems to deal with. There are the behavior problems seen in some females searching or yearning for available males. Owners of females in heat also frequently have to deal with a sudden influx of male cats around the home and yard. The howling at 2 a.m. will affect your behavior as well as your cat's.
  • Unspayed females may spray urine when they are heat. This can be difficult to stop, and it is highly recommended that such cats are spayed as part of the treatment.

Early spaying

In the United States, most cats are spayed between 5 and 8 months of age. Many animal shelters and veterinarians are starting to spay female animals at a younger age, even at 2 months. This early neutering does not affect the growth rate, and there are no appreciable differences in skeletal, physical, or behavioral development between those animals neutered early than those neutered at a more traditional age. It must be remembered that younger animals may need different anesthetics and are more prone to hypothermia (lower than normal body temperature) during surgery. As long as procedures are modified to account for these differences, early spaying is very safe. In fact, animals spayed at a younger age often have faster recoveries than those spayed when they are older.

Summary

As can be seen from our discussion, an ovariohysterectomy eliminates many medical and behavioral problems. In fact, in many cats, an OHE probably adds years to their lives or at least provides them with a more comfortable, less stressful life. The OHE does its part in pet overpopulation, but you, as the owner of an individual cat, should also view it as a way to increase the length and quality of your pet's life with you.

source: http://www.peteducation.com/article....1+2235&aid=925
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:21 AM
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Default Re: Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

A Pictorial Veterinary Guide To Spaying Procedure

What is spaying surgery - cat spaying procedure - and why do we do it?

Spaying or desexing is the surgical removal of a female (queen) cat's internal reproductive structures, including her ovaries (site of ova/egg production), Fallopian tubes, uterine horns (the two long tubes of uterus where the foetal kittens develop and grow) and a section of her uterine body (the part of the uterus where the uterine horns merge and become one body).

The picture below shows a cat uterus that has been removed by cat spaying surgery - it is labeled to give you a clear indication of the reproductive structures that are removed at surgery. The uterine horns in this pictured uterus are thicker than normal because this particular cat was in heat or just finishing her heat at the time of desexing surgery. The uterine horns and uterine body of a not-in-heat adult cat or a kitten (early age spay) are much thinner and stretchier than those of an in-season cat (which is why we vets prefer to perform spay surgery on animals that are not in season).



Basically, the parts of the female reproductive tract that get removed are those which are responsible for egg (ova) production, embryo and fetus development and the secretion of the major female hormones (oestrogen and progesterone being the main ones). Removal of these structures plays a big role in feline population control; feline genetic disease control; the prevention and/or treatment of various medical disorders and female cat behavioral modification (e.g. estrogen is responsible for many female cat behavioral traits that some owners find problematic - e.g. roaming, calling for males - and spaying, by removing the source of female hormones like estrogen, may help to resolve these issues).

The rest of this page contains a step-by-step pictorial guide to the process of female cat spaying surgery (the spaying operation that your veterinarian will perform). We can't quite provide you with a video on cat spaying procedure, however, we do hope that our detailed virtual guide to feline spaying will provide you with enough visual information to help you to understand the cat spaying process. Enjoy.

The whole feline spaying procedure, excluding anaesthesia induction and skin preparation time, takes around 5-15 minutes.


WARNING - IN THE INTERESTS OF PROVIDING YOU WITH COMPLETE AND DETAILED INFORMATION, THIS PAGE DOES CONTAIN EXPLICIT MEDICAL AND SURGICAL IMAGES THAT MAY DISTURB SENSITIVE READERS.

CAT SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 1: The cat is placed under anaesthesia.




Images 1 and 2: The cat must be anesthetised prior to spay surgery being performed, both so that it will not move whilst the spaying procedure is being performed and also so that it will not experience any pain. The cat is given a series of injectable sedative and general anesthetic drugs to make it go to sleep (fall unconscious); an endotracheal (ET) tube is placed down its trachea (main airway) to help it to breathe better and to keep its airway free of vomit and other secretions and the cat is maintained under anesthesia by the addition of anesthetic gas vapours to the oxygen that it breathes (the oxygen and anesthetic gas vapors are supplied by an anesthetic machine, which is linked to the cat's endotracheal tube).

CAT SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 2: The cat's belly is shaved (clipped free of fur).


Image 3: This a picture of a cat's belly (abdomen) being clipped free of fur prior to female cat desexing surgery being performed. It is important to remove all of the fur so that there will be minimal hair and bacterial contamination of the surgical site.

Author's note: although veterinary nurses take great care to avoid cutting the female cat's nipples with the clippers during pre-surgical shaving, these nipples are tiny and easily nicked. It is not uncommon for the occasional nipple to be cut during pre-surgical clipping. If you see a cut nipple, don't worry! These nipple lacerations generally heal up fine.


Picture 4: This is what the cat's belly will look like when it has been clipped for a spaying procedure.

CAT SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 3: The surgical site is scrubbed.


Picture 5: This is a picture of a female cat's abdomen (surgical site) being scrubbed with an antiseptic, antibacterial solution (chlorhexidine scrub and alcohol) prior to desexing surgery. This pre-surgical skin preparation reduces the amount of bacterial contamination that is present on the skin prior to the first incision being made.

CAT SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 4: Draping the cat spay site.





Picture 6: This is a close-up picture of the surgical spay site, just prior to placing the surgical drape on the cat's abdomen. The cat's head is located towards the right of the image. The image shows the abdominal landmarks that most veterinarians use to guide their first spay incision. The first incision (which can be anywhere from 1-3cm long) is usually made about an inch below the animal's umbilical scar (the small white scar in the centre of the cat's abdomen where the umbilical cord once attached), on the midline of the abdomen.

Image 7: A sterile surgical drape is placed around the surgical site. This drape acts to focus the veterinary surgeon's attention on the spay site. It also acts to cover up the non-surgically-prepared, contaminated regions (e.g. the furred, unclipped regions) located outside of the shaved and prepped site so that the veterinarian can not accidentally touch them and inadvertently contaminate the surgical site. Additionally, the drape also provides a sterile surface for the vet to rest instruments periodically during surgery.

CAT SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 5: The skin is incised and the cat's abdomen entered.





Photograph 8: A small incision (usually around 1cm long, but can be up to 3-4 cm long) is made in the cat's skin, approximately 1 inch below the umbilical scar on the abdominal midline.

Picture 9: In this image, the veterinary surgeon is removing some of the fat (termed subcutaneous or SC fat) from the incision line region. The fat is the white, shiny substance in the centre of the incision line. There is generally a lot of fat located between the cat's skin and its abdominal wall muscles. The veterinarian will often cut a small amount of this fat away, allowing easy access to and visualisation of the cat's abdominal wall muscles.





Image 10: The veterinarian enters the cat's abdominal cavity by cutting through the abdominal wall musculature on the midline of the abdomen. The veterinarian aims to cut along a central line of scar tissue that joins the right and left sides of the animal's abdominal wall musculature. This line of scar tissue is called the linea alba (literally meaning - "white line"). By cutting through scar tissue, rather than the red muscle located either side of the linea alba, the veterinarian reduces the amount of bleeding incurred in entering the cat's abdominal cavity.

Photograph 11: This is a close-up picture of the incision line after the linea alba has been incised. You can see the hole going into the abdominal cavity.

SPAYING CATS PROCEDURE STEP 6: The first uterine horn is revealed.





Image 12: A spay hook is inserted into the cat's abdominal cavity to hook and draw up the first uterine horn.

Photograph 13: This is a picture of the first uterine horn being lifted up and drawn out through the abdominal incision line.

SPAYING CATS PROCEDURE STEP 7: The ovarian blood vessels are clamped and ligated.





Image 14: The blood vessels (artery and vein) supplying the cat's ovary are elevated and clamped off using mosquito hemostats (artery forceps). These hemostat clamps crush and traumatize the ovarian blood vessels, causing them to spasm and narrow in diameter, thereby aiding in preventing excessive ovarian pedicle hemorrhage when the ovary is cut off.

Picture 15: A suture (stitch) is placed around the blood vessels supplying the ovary (the general term for the blood vessels - artery and vein - supplying the ovary is the ovarian pedicle). This suture ties off and occludes the ovarian blood vessels supplying the ovary, thereby preventing excessive ovarian pedicle hemorrhage when the ovary is cut off.





Pictures 16 and 17: More images of the suture (also called a ligature) being placed around the blood vessels supplying the ovary. This suture ties off and occludes the ovarian blood vessels supplying the ovary, thereby preventing excessive ovarian pedicle hemorrhage when the ovary is cut off. Once the ligature has been tied and knotted tightly, the long suture ends are trimmed away leaving only a small knot behind (image 17).

SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 8: The ovarian pedicle is cut above the sutures.




Image 18: A scalpel blade is used to cut through the ovarian pedicle (ovarian artery and vein) supplying the ovary. The cut is made above the level of the hemostat clamp and the ovarian pedicle ligature so that the blood vessels (in particular, the ovarian artery) will not bleed when they are incised, but below the ovary such that the ovary will be removed from the ovarian pedicle when the cut is made.

Picture 19: This is the appearance of the ovarian pedicle after the cut has been made. The hemostats are still in place in this image with the ligature located beneath them (hidden from view in this pic) - the hemostats will be removed, allowing the ovarian pedicle and its ligature to return back inside the abdomen. The ovary, still attached to its uterine horn, is reflected caudally (towards the animal's tail).

SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 9: Steps 6-8 are repeated for the second uterine horn.





Image 20: This is a picture of the second uterine horn being lifted up and drawn out through the cat's abdominal spay incision line.

Photograph 21: The blood vessels (artery and vein) supplying the cat's second ovary are elevated and clamped off using mosquito hemostats (artery forceps). These hemostat clamps crush and traumatise the ovarian blood vessels, causing them to spasm and narrow in diameter, thereby aiding in preventing excessive ovarian pedicle hemorrhage when the second ovary is cut off.





Pictures 22 and 23: As occurred with the first ovarian pedicle, a suture (also called a ligature) is placed around the blood vessels (termed the ovarian pedicle) supplying the second ovary. This suture ties off and occludes the ovarian blood vessels supplying the ovary, thereby preventing excessive ovarian pedicle hemorrhage when the ovary is cut off. Once the ligature has been tied, the long suture ends are trimmed away, leaving a small knot behind (image 23).

Following the placement of this ligature, a scalpel is then used to cut through the ovarian pedicle supplying the second ovary. The cut is made above the level of the hemostat and the ovarian ligature (suture) so that the blood vessels (in particular, the ovarian artery) will not bleed when they are incised, but below the ovary such that the ovary will be removed (along with the uterine horn) from the ovarian pedicle when the cut is made.

CAT SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 10: The uterine body is revealed and ligated.




Picture 24: The two uterine horns are pulled caudally (towards the cat's tail) until the uterine body (the place where the two uterine horns merge and become one uterus body) is revealed and elevated above the level of the skin incision (where it is easily accessible to the surgeon). One or more hemostats are clamped across the uterine body, below the level of the uterine horns and just above the level of the cervix (the cervix is a sphincter-like muscle band located further down the uterine body, which forms a physical barrier between the abdominally-located uterus and the pelvically-located vagina).

Image 25: A suture (ligature) is placed around the uterine body. The suture's role is to close off the tunnel leading into the uterus from the outside world. This will prevent bacteria from entering the abdominal cavity, via ascension from the vagina, once the uterus is removed.
The uterine body ligature also acts to occlude the uterine blood vessels (the uterine arteries and veins), which run along each side of the uterine body and supply the uterus, thereby stopping them from hemorrhaging once the uterine body has been excised (cut off).





Image 26: The ligature is now tied around the feline uterine body and the surgeon is just cutting the long suture ends away from the knot. Vet surgeons don't like to leave a lot of excess suture material lying around inside an animal's abdomen. Excess suture material can lead to irritation and inflammation occurring inside the abdomen and cause adhesions (where the organs get stuck together by scar tissue) to form between organs.

Picture 27: The appearance of the ligature once the long suture ends have been cut off the knot.

SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 11: A second ligature is placed around the uterine body.


Image 28: Termed "double-ligating", it is not uncommon for many veterinary surgeons to place a second ligature around the uterine body (in addition to the first ligature) for extra security.

FELINE SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 12: The uterine body is transected (cut off).



Picture 29: The uterine body is transected (cut off) above the level of the ligatures.

This essentially completes the process of removing the uterus from the female cat. The animal will now no longer be able to reproduce. This is an irreversible surgical procedure.

CAT SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 13: The abdominal wall is sutured closed.




Pictures 30 and 31: The surgeon uses absorbable suture material to close the hole in the abdominal wall musculature (linea alba). Because the linea alba is essentially a tendon-like, collagenous structure (made of collagen), it has less blood supply than red muscle and, therefore, takes longer to heal than muscle would. To take this slower healing into account, the veterinarian often uses a longer-lasting suture (a suture that is slower to lose its strength and slower to absorb) to close the linea alba. Because this suture absorbs over time, the vet does not have to remove it later on.


Image 32:The linea alba has been sutured closed.

SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 14: The subcutaneous fat layer is sutured closed.


Photo 33: The subcutaneous fat layer (also called the SC or sub-q layer) is sutured closed. This layer closure acts to reduce the amount of open space (called 'dead space') located between the abdominal wall and skin layers, thereby reducing the risk of a large, fluid-filled swelling (called a seroma) forming at the surgery site. Basically, whatever space/gap you leave in a surgery site, fluid will pool in - by closing down this open space (dead space), the vet surgeon essentially leaves fewer sites available for inflammatory fluids to pool in.

SPAYING PROCEDURE STEP 15: The skin layer is sutured closed.




Images 34 and 35: The surgeon is closing the skin using non-absorbable skin sutures. These will need to be removed in 10-14 days.

NOTE - absorbable skin sutures can also be placed. These are called intradermal sutures and they do not need to be removed.

THE FINAL RESULT - A NEWLY DESEXED CAT.



source: http://www.pet-informed-veterinary-a...procedure.html
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Old 10-28-2010, 01:25 AM
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Default Re: Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

Spay Procedure Aftercare

The Procedure:

Your pet has just received major abdominal surgery. Remember, a “spay” is an ovariohysterectomy. Both ovaries and the uterus have been removed.A ventral midline incision was used and your pet will have a faint scar along its tummy. Every effort will be made to make sure she looks good for bikini season!

Keeping your pet’s activity restricted and preventing self trauma from licking are key factors in ensuring a successful surgery. All pets will be given pain medication to ensure a comfortable recovery.

Considerations:

Some people think that their pets won’t be “the same” after becoming spayed. In actuality, your female dog or cat will likely be better behaved and will DEFINITELY be healthier. Spaying eliminates messy and annoying heat cycles and can prevent dangerous health problems such as ovarian cancer and pyometra (a life-threatening infection of the uterus). Altered pets are cleaner, somewhat calmer, and most importantly, healthier!

Food & Water:

Feed 1/2 the normal diet after 8:00 pm, on the evening of the surgery
May resume normal diet by the next morning
Limit excessive water intake

Post-operative Care:
  1. Take care while carrying your pet home, trying not to move or touch the operated area.
  2. Your pet may take anywhere from 1 – 3 hours before it starts to wake up from the anaesthetic. During this time, it is important to place your pet in a safe, sheltered and quiet area for recovery, where it could not fall down and hurt itself (as your pet may not be able to balance itself yet).
  3. Place your pet on some bedding such as cloth or newspapers to keep them warm. Your pet may urinate/defecate while still anaesthetized, so be sure to keep them clean and dry.
  4. Offer your pet food and water only when your pet is up and able to walk properly (your pet may drown in the water bowl if it is still sleepy). Sometimes, your pet will only gain its appetite the day after the operation (it takes overnight for your pet to fully recover from the anaesthetic). During this recovery, some pets may vomit. Do not be alarmed, it is common for this occur.
  5. Confine your pet for 10-14 days after the day of surgery (if possible in a cage), to limit their activity and movement. This ensures proper healing of the wound.
  6. Check on the operated area at least once a day for the next 2 weeks. Make sure the area is always clean and dry, and the wound is not opened. If you notice any problems such as bloody discharge, pus, sudden swelling, foul smell, or opening of the wound, please contact a vet right away!
  7. Some pets may have a bandage over the operated area. You may leave it on for 3-4 days, as long as it is clean and dry. If the pet removes the bandage by itself sooner than 3-4 days, it is OK. Your pet may lick the area a little, but do check that they do not lick and bite excessively.
  8. Do not bathe your pet for at least 7 days. If your pet is dirty, wipe it with a damp towel. Please keep the incision site dry, as water may go in and infection will occur.

Early Age Neutering - Post-Operative Care
  1. Please wait for at least 1 hour in the clinic after the surgery to ensure that your pet fully recovers from the anaesthetics.
  2. Offer some food about 1 hour after surgery, or when they are fully awake.
  3. Bring your pet home in a towel/cloth to keep them warm.
  4. Place your pet in a safe, quiet and dark place when arrive home.
  5. A few hours after the surgery, there may be some vomiting or the animal may urinate/defecate while sleeping. This is OK. Just remember to clean it up.
  6. Ensure they are kept clean, warm and dry, and has access to clean drinking water at all times.
  7. Confine your pet for 10-14 days after the day of surgery (if possible in a cage), to limit their activity and movement. This ensures proper healing of the wound.
  8. Offer food several times a day. If your pet is not eating or has no appetite after the surgery, try to hand feed/coax feed some of its favourite food. If they are still not eating, take them back to the vet IMMEDIATELY!!
  9. Check on the incision site several times a day. The wound should be clean and dry. If the wound has opened up, or if you notice any pus or blood coming out from the wound, take them back to the vet AS SOON AS POSSIBLE!

Signs to Monitor:

Loss of appetite for over 2 days
Refusal to drink water for 24 hours
Weakness
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Depression

Eliminations:

Your pet may NOT have a normal bowel movement for 24-36 hours after surgery. This is normal and not cause for alarm. Remember that your pet has been fasting and has been under anesthesia.

If any problem arises, please contact a vet as soon as possible!!

Last edited by blackie007; 10-28-2010 at 11:46 AM.
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  #6  
Old 10-28-2010, 11:51 AM
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blackie007 blackie007 is offline
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Default Re: Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

Are Muslims Allowed to Spay/neuter Their Pets?

Below is the "fatwa" issued by JAKIM (Jawatankuasa Kemajuan Islam Malaysia) in July 2002:

"Bahawa mengembiri binatang kesayangan seperti kucing atau anjing hukumnya adalah diharuskan dengan sebab-sebab tertentu iaitu bagi menjaga muslahat ummah."

"All pets like cats and dogs are allowed to be neutered or spayed in order to maintain the health and welfare of both the animals and the community."


Quote:
We have referred to the "Jawatankuasa Kemajuan Islam Malaysia" regarding the neutering of pets. Below is the "fatwa" issued by JAKIM (July 2002):

"All pets like cats and dogs are allowed to be neutered or spayed in order to maintain the health and welfare of both the animals and the community."

"Bahawa mengembiri binatang kesayangan seperti kucing atau anjing hukumnya adalah diharuskan dengan sebab-sebab tertentu iaitu bagi menjaga muslahat ummah."

After studying the messages of the aforementioned "mazhab"s and the medical viewpoint of the SPCA animal experts, 'JAKIM' has decided that neutering of cats for reasons of 'maslahat' is acceptable. It is in agreement with 'qaedah' (way) Fiqhiyyah which states "To choose the lesser of two evils".

source: http://www.spca.org.my/v51/klinikkembiri_fatwa.php
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Old 10-28-2010, 11:59 AM
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Default Re: Spaying & Neutering Your Cats

I Can't Afford The Cost of The Spay Procedure

The good news is, for those living in KL and Selangor, DBKL (the city council) and SPCA Selangor has a Klinik Kembiri that charges RM40 to castrate a male, RM60 to spay a female, and RM70 for a pregnant female. However, only domestic cats are eligible, as their view is that if you could afford to buy a pedigree, you could surely afford a private vet.

Quote:
General Information
All spaying/neutering surgeries are by appointment only. Please call our clinic at 03-40243446 or 012-2581041 (Mr G. R. Krishnan) for an appointment. Walk-ins may not be entertained.

Please adhere to the following rules:
a. Your pet should be fasted from 8pm onwards the night before the surgery (applies to food and water).
b. Your pet must be in good health – sick pets will be rejected for the surgery. Get your pet treated at a government or private clinic first.
c. Do inform us if your pet has been vaccinated or not (it is recommended that your pet be vaccinated first).
d. Do inform us if your female pet is currently on heat or pregnant (on heat or pregnant pets will have a higher risks during surgery).
e. Make sure your pet is cleaned before sending – including getting the ticks/flea problem under control.
f. Cats should be brought to the clinic in carriers/cages and dogs should be leashed at all times.
g. Any pet above 2 months old and weighing at least 1kg is eligible.
h. This clinic is only for local or mixed breed pets.
i. This low cost only applies to lower income owners.

On the day of surgery:
a. Come to the clinic early, preferably before noon. Although appointments are made for the day, it is a first-come first-serve basis on that particular day.
b. Register with the guard at the gate.
c. Make sure cat is secured in a carrier/cage and dog is on a leash. Dog is to be tied at the designated area.
d. Come into the Klinik Kembiri’s office area and fill in the required forms. Please inform us if your pet has been sick recently or if it is on heat/pregnant. You should clarify all enquiries before the surgery begins.
e. It is advisable to stay in the clinic area until your pet recovers from the anaesthetics before bringing them home.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Address:
DBKL-SPCA KLINIK KEMBIRI
Pusat Kurungan Haiwan
Jabatan Kesihatan DBKL
Jalan Air Jerneh
Air Panas, Setapak
53200 Kuala Lumpur

Tel:
03-40243446 (office)
012-2581041 (Manager – Mr G.R. Krishnan)




source:http://www.spca.org.my/neuter.htm
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