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  #1  
Old 12-19-2008, 09:22 AM
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lynielime lynielime is offline
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Default Benefits of Spay/Neuter for Dogs and Cats

Hello everyone. I'm rather tired of people asking me why i make spaying/neutering compulsory for any animals adopted from me. I would really appreciate if people would be better educated before attempting to take care of an animal. Here are articles about the many benefits of neutering and spaying. Thank you for attention.

From: http://www.spayusa.org/main_director...enefits_sn.asp

BENEFITS OF SPAY/NEUTER FOR CATS AND DOGS
Benefits of Spaying (females):
No heat cycles, therefore males will not be attracted
Less desire to roam
Risk of mammary gland tumors, ovarian and/or uterine cancer is reduced or eliminated, especially if done before the first heat cycle
Reduces number of unwanted cats/kittens/dogs/puppies
Helps dogs and cats live longer, healthier lives


Benefits of Neutering (males):
Reduces or eliminates risk of spraying and marking
Less desire to roam, therefore less likely to be injured in fights or auto accidents
Risk of testicular cancer is eliminated, and decreases incidence of prostate disease
Reduces number of unwanted cats/kittens/dogs/puppies
Decreases aggressive behavior, including dog bites
Helps dogs and cats live longer, healthier lives


Top 3 Reasons to Spay and Neuter
It helps to reduce companion animal overpopulation. Most countries have a surplus of companion animals and are forced to euthanize or disregard their great suffering. The surplus is in the millions in the United States. Cats are 45 times as prolific, and dogs 15 times as prolific, as humans.They do not need our help to expand their numbers; they need our help to reduce their numbers until there are good homes for them all.

Sterilization of your cat or dog will increase his/her chance of a longer and healthier life. Altering your canine friend will increase his life an average of 1 to 3 years, felines, 3 to 5 years. Altered animals have a very low to no risk of mammary gland tumors/cancer, prostate cancer, perianal tumors, pyometria, and uterine, ovarian and testicular cancers.
Sterilizing your cat/dog makes him/her a better pet, reducing his/her urge to roam and decreasing the risk of contracting diseases or getting hurt as they roam. Surveys indicate that as many as 85% of dogs hit by cars are unaltered. Intact male cats living outside have been shown to live on average less than two years. Feline Immunodeficiency Syndrome is spread by bites and intact cats fight a great deal more than altered cats.

Additional Benefits:

Your community will also benefit. Unwanted animals are becoming a very real concern in many places. Stray animals can easily become a public nuisance, soiling parks and streets, ruining shrubbery, frightening children and elderly people, creating noise and other disturbances, causing automobile accidents, and sometimes even killing livestock or other pets.
- The American Veterinary Medical Association


The capture, impoundment and eventual destruction of unwanted animals costs taxpayers and private humanitarian agencies over a billion dollars each year. As a potential source of rabies and other less serious diseases, they can be a public health hazard.
- The American Veterinary Medical Association
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  #2  
Old 12-19-2008, 09:27 AM
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Default Re: Benefits of Spay/Neuter for Dogs and Cats

Taken from:
http://www.rainanimals.org/spayneuterbenefits.html

Why You Should Spay or Neuter your Pet
Did you know?

Each day 10,000 humans are born in the U.S. - and each day 70,000 puppies and kittens are born. As long as these birth rates exist, there will never be enough homes for all the animals. As a result, every year 4 to 6 million animals are euthanized because there are no homes for them.

What can you do to stop the suffering?
Spay and neuter your pet! In addition to saving lives, spaying and neutering can also drastically improve your pet's health and life expectancy. The idea that pets become fat or lazy when they are spayed or neutered is a myth. Sterilized pets lead healthier, longer lives. Spaying a female eliminates the possibility of uterine and ovarian cancer and greatly reduces the risk of breast cancer. Neutering a male reduces the risk of both prostate enlargement and prostate cancer. Neutering also will make your pet more affectionate and less likely to roam, get in fights, or become lost.

Good for You, Your Pet, and the Community

Prevent A Litter - It's Good for You
Spayed and neutered pets are better, more affectionate, companions.
Neutered cats are less likely to spray and mark territory.
Spaying a female dog or cat eliminates its heat cycle, which can last twenty-one days, twice a year, in dogs, and anywhere from three to fifteen days, three or more times a year, in cats. Females in heat often cry incessantly, show nervous behavior, and attract unwanted male animals.
Spayed and neutered pets are less likely to bite. Unaltered animals often exhibit more behavior and temperament problems than those that have been spayed or neutered.
Prevent a Litter - It's Good for Your Pet
Spayed and neutered dogs and cats live longer, healthier lives.
Spaying female dogs and cats eliminates the possibility of uterine or ovarian cancer and greatly reduces the incidence of breast cancer.
Neutering male dogs and cats reduces the incidence of prostate cancer.
Neutered animals are less likely to roam and fight.
Prevent A Litter - It's Good for the Community
Communities spend millions of dollars to control and eliminate unwanted animals. Irresponsible breeding contributes to the problem of dog bites and attacks. Animal shelters are overburdened with surplus animals.
Just the Facts:
Kittens and puppies can be spayed or neutered as young as 8 weeks of age. All sterilization surgery is performed under general anesthesia by a licensed veterinarian.
Female dogs and cats can be spayed when in heat or pregnant. This can usually be done up until a few days before delivery. These surgeries can take longer, and can therefore cost more.
Spaying before having a first litter or heat cycle is usually a simpler procedure. The heat cycle for dogs is once or twice a year starting as early as 6 months of age. Duration is 3 weeks. Heat cycles in cats start as early as 6 months and occur every 3-4 weeks during spring through early fall.
The gestation period for both dogs and cats is 63 days. Female cats can become pregnant again as soon as 10 days after giving birth (while still nursing the first litter).
Health Benefits of Spaying and Neutering
Spayed and neutered animals no longer feel the need to roam to look for a mate. The result is that they stay home and have less chance of being involved in traumatic accidents such as being hit by a car.
Spayed and neutered animals also have a much lower incidence of contracting contagious diseases, and get into fewer fights.
In males, neutering decreases the chances of developing prostatic disease and hernias, and eliminates the chances of developing testicular cancer. It also reduces problems with territorial and sexual aggression, inappropriate urination (spraying) and other undesirable male behaviors.
In Females, spaying decreases the incidence of breast cancer (the rate goes down to almost zero if the spaying is done before the first heat cycle!). It eliminates the chance of developing a serious and potentially fatal infection of the uterus experienced by many mature unspayed animals (pyometra).
Spay surgery also eliminates the heat cycle and associated mood swings and undesirable behaviors, messy spotting (in dogs) and the attraction of all available males to your yard.
The simple fact is that spaying and neutering greatly increases the lifespan of your pet and increases quality of life as well!
Spaying or neutering increases your pet's chances for a longer, healthier life.

Spaying your pet before her first estrous cycle (that is, before she reaches sexual maturity) greatly reduces her chances of developing breast cancer and completely eliminates the threat of uterine and ovarian cancer and uterine infection, which are common occurrences in unaltered females.
Neutering your male dog or cat prevents testicular tumors and may prevent prostate problems. Neutering also decreases the possibility of perianal tumors and hernias, which are commonly observed in older, unaltered dogs. Because neutered cats are less likely to roam, the threat of abscesses caused by bites and diseases transmitted by fighting are greatly reduced.
An altered dog or cat is a better pet for your family.
Males neutered early in life are less aggressive toward other males and are not distracted by females in heat. Therefore, a neutered male will be less tempted to leave your property and cross that dangerous highway searching for a mate. Neutered males also are less likely to mark every one of your (or your neighbor's) expensive shrubs with his urine as well as inside the house.
Spaying your female pet eliminates the problem of stray males camping in your yard and decreases her desire to roam and breed.
No family wants to cope with an unwanted pregnancy.
While you may find friends or family to take the puppies or kittens, they may not spay or neuter them and more animals will be born, unwanted.
Spaying prevents your pet from giving birth to unwanted puppies or kittens.

Spaying results in a cleaner female dog and home.
Because female dogs pass bloody fluid for about ten days, twice a year, as a part of their estrous cycle, constant care must be taken to avoid carpet stains in homes with such animals. Spaying your dog eliminates this problem.

You are helping to alleviate the dog and cat overpopulation problem.
Each year, millions of unwanted dogs and cats are euthanized (killed) at shelters across the country. Although pet behavioral problems are the main reasons animals are given to shelters, many orphans are the result of accidental breeding by free-roaming, unaltered pets. The more pets spayed or neutered, the fewer dogs and cats will have to be destroyed.

Please don't breed or buy, while shelter animals die!
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Old 12-19-2008, 09:29 AM
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Default Re: Benefits of Spay/Neuter for Dogs and Cats

Taken from http://www.oregonvma.org/petowners/spayneuter.asp


Benefits of Spaying or Neutering Your Pet

Sadly, each year more than 15 million dogs and cats are killed in the US because of overpopulation.

Altering pets through spay/neuter surgery helps prevent the unwanted birth of animals that would be difficult to place into good homes.

The spaying and neutering of pets can also reduce the incidence of sex-hormone related diseases.

Frequently Asked Questions
Will my dog or cat be a better pet after altering?
What are some of the other known advantages of having my pet altered?
What is actually done in a spay or neuter procedure?
How old should my pet be before surgery?
Should the female have a heat period or a litter before being spayed?
Is it safe for a dog or cat to be spayed when she is in heat or pregnant?
Isnít it unnatural to deprive my pet of a sex life?
Why shouldnít I just keep my female dog or cat confined while she is in heat?
Will spaying or neutering my pet cause it to become fat and lazy?
I can't afford to spay or neuter my pet. Is there a source for financial assistance?
1. Will my dog or cat be a better pet after altering?
Yes. In addition to the benefits of not having heat periods and unwanted offspring, the animalís tendency to roam is decreased. Most pets become less aggressive toward people and other animals.

2. What are some of the other known advantages of having my pet altered?
The neutered male cat has a decreased urine odor, less of a tendency to fight and roam, and it is far less inclined to mark its territory by spraying urine.

The neutered male dog is also less likely to roam, mark territory, and display aggression toward other dogs. Neutered dogs have fewer tumors around the anus and decreased urine odor.

The spayed female cat and dog do not have reproductive tract disease problems, have less urinary tract infections, and significantly fewer cases of mammary cancer.

3. What is actually done in a spay or neuter procedure?
In both cases, the animal is put under general anesthesia so that it cannot feel anything.

A spay surgery (also called an ovariohysterectomy) is performed on females. While performed routinely, an ovariohysterectomy is a major surgery in which the reproductive tract Ė including the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and uterus Ė is removed. Bloodwork may be performed to make sure the pet is healthy enough for anesthesia and surgery.

Neutering refers to the castration of a male animal. It is a surgical procedure in which both testicles are removed. Neutering requires considerably less time and equipment than a spay surgery.

4. How old should my pet be before surgery?
Consult with your veterinarian about the best age for your pet to have this surgery.

In most cases, it is considered safe to alter dogs and cats as early as eight weeks of age.

There may be health risks/concerns specific to certain breeds and sizes of dogs, specifically larger breeds; your veterinarian may advise waiting to perform this surgery until the dog is 6 months to one year or older.

As long as they are healthy enough for surgery, there is generally no upper age limit for pets to be spayed or neutered and, in fact, older pets can benefit from the surgery.

5. Should the female have a heat period or a litter before being spayed?
If your pet is going to be a companion animal rather than a breeding animal, then there are no benefits to allowing her to have a litter or to go through a heat period.

It is actually healthier for your dog or cat never to experience a heat as it lessenís the animalís chance of getting mammary cancer and decreases the animalís stress and risks due to pregnancy and delivery.

Research indicates that dogs spayed prior to their first heat have less than a half of one percent chance of experiencing mammary cancer as compared to an eight percent chance after the second heat.

Cats spayed after their first heat have a seven times greater chance of suffering from mammary cancer than cats spayed prior to their first heat.

6. Is it safe for a dog or cat to be spayed when she is in heat or pregnant?
Females in good health can have the surgery done when they are in heat or pregnant. Talk with your veterinarians as to what is best for your pet.

7. Isnít it unnatural to deprive my pet of a sex life?
No. Dogs and cats have sex strictly to satisfy hormone-induced instincts, not for pleasure.

8. Why shouldnít I just keep my female dog or cat confined while she is in heat?
You can do this, of course. But, remember, your unspayed dog will come into heat twice a year for its entire life. A cat comes into heat once a month for its entire life. Also, do not forget all of the other health benefits of spay surgery.

9. Will spaying or neutering my pet cause it to become fat and lazy?
No. Weight gain is due to being fed more calories than the animal uses. Watch the quantity of food you give your pet. Also, older pets need fewer calories than younger ones because they tend to be less active and are no longer growing. Regular play and exercise, along with diet, are the keys to keeping your pet in shape.
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Old 12-20-2008, 02:37 PM
miket miket is offline
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Default Re: Benefits of Spay/Neuter for Dogs and Cats - Aggression of dogs.

Recently found this site and was surprised to see so many inidividuals working to save or rescue unwanted pets.

lynielime's posts above are of course correct. Though to some the list of benefits for neutering may sound somewhat remote. So, if I can add to her posts, it is this - with particular reference to working dog breeds - spaying or neutering your pet will reduce the excitability / aggression / uncontrollability of your pet dog.

I have much less experience with cats but I believe the benefits are similiar.

Further, it is good that lynielime makes references to sites that discusses these matters because I find that most forums talks quite a bit, but usually based on anecdotal evidence. It would serve us all more if we get a tad more scientific because, after all, vet science is not new nor irrelevant.

Meantime, keep it up.

Last edited by miket; 12-20-2008 at 02:42 PM.
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